Past Editions

Amr Khaled
Saturday, April 9th, 2011

Egyptian society is at a crossroads and the people have a choice between resurgence and chaos, said Amr Khaled, famous Islamic televangelist in a lec­ture he gave at AUC last Monday.

In the lecture, titled “Raise Your Head You Are an Egyptian,” Khaled addressed four main points integral to the advancement of Egypt and its popu­lation at large.

In his first point, Khaled expressed the impor­tance of having a dream. He urged everyone to find a goal they strive to achieve.

“You must have a dream, you have no excuse not to dream,” said Khaled.

He described the Aswan Dam as being the last dream Egyptians accomplished. Khaled also stressed on the willingness to

make sacrifices, ex­plaining that the road to victory will entail many. ‘The sky is your limit’ was the theme of his first point.
Suzanne Mubarak Hall
Sunday, April 17th, 2011
Following mounting pressure from students and alumni, university administration has decided to suspend the naming of the Suzanne Mubarak conference hall as of April 17. The announcement came exactly one month after students forcibly removed the plaque bearing the former First Lady’s name.

The issue had first become a point of conflict when AUC students started an online petition earlier this semester to rename the hall, in light of the January 25 revolution.
Artifacts
Saturday, April 9th, 2011

The Caravan’s investigation into the recent theft of antiquities has revealed that in a period spanning several decades AUC faculty and officials collected more than 1,600 artifacts described by Egyptology experts to be ‘of no great significance’ in value.

(Six suspects have been arrested in the theft of the antiquities stored below Ewart Hall - click here)

Ironically, the theft of some of these items brought to light the previously unknown cache stored beneath Ewart Hall.

Renowned Egyptologist and professor emeri­tus Kent R. Weeks told The Caravan that “the ob­jects in Ewart Hall were acquired by then-President Richard Pederson, who for some reason thought it would be nice to have a teaching collection of an­tiquities on campus.”

Saturday, April 9th, 2011

A forum that examines proposed amendments to AUC’s freedom of expression policy and calls for these liberties to be “at once fiercely guarded and genuinely embraced”, is likely to be considered a giant leap forward when it kicks off at Mohamed Shafik Gabr Lecture Hall in the Campus Center at 1PM today.

AUC President Lisa Anderson appointed a Task Force to review and re-write the freedom of expres­sion policy in light of the January 25 Revolution and changes throughout the local media landscape. The old policy, instituted by former President Richard F. Pedersen, enforced many restrictions which the new policy hopes to amend, chiefly by removing limitations on student expression and activities.

Saturday, April 16th, 2011

A quarrel took place between campaigners for two presidential candidates at the Student Union (SU) elections debate. Some said the situation was on the verge of turning into a full fledged fight, while others described it as an argument between two friends.

“It wasn't a physical fight but it would have reached this if I and some others, hadn’t helped in controlling the situation,” Mohanned Gomaa, current SU president, said.

“Two friends campaigning for different candidates were teasing each other, there was no fight, no problem not even verbally, it was people’s reactions which made it seem so,” Amr Abaza, a member of the Student Judicial Board (SJB) said.The SJB is one of the entities on campus which is responsible for coordinating the SU elections and its debates.

ElBaradei
Saturday, April 9th, 2011
Mohamed ElBaradei, an activist and presiden­tial candidate, compared Egypt’s nascent political reforms to “children crawling to reach democracy [and] God is the only perfection,” when he spoke at the AUC New Cairo campus on April 7.

During the lecture, ElBaradei highlighted Egypt’s current political challenges  and discussed the steps the country should take toward reform.

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